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Forum Index > Rifles general discussion > Picking bullets for our needs

Picking bullets for our needs

30 Sep 2015
@ 08:10 pm (GMT)

Brendon Greig

Hi guys was wondering if there is a site comparing bullets to make it easier to work out what suits best
I have had my operation and spent my time reading Nathans practical guide series i have finished the fist one and are 7/8 the way through long range hunting cartridges and his reloading book should be here today
all through the book it explains how when to close you can get bullet blow up or pin hole wounding rather than clean rapid kills and how a lot of the fragmenting bullets work better when loosing a bit of velocity so what im asking is there somewhere to look and find X projectile is best suited at X speed to make it easier to choose a couple of projectiles to carry 1 for up close and 1 for distance
at present i am using Sierra 85 grain HPBT in my 243 and it loves them having been on a goat culling trip recently i became aware that they may not have been opening up enough at close range (we were getting them from 30 meters on wards) in Nathans book he says Sierras are a little tough in there jacket and improve with drilling out or annealing so as i have about 100 still loaded i thought i might touch the top of them with a fine counter sink dremal bit i have which should make them open faster we are also going to try some 87 grain vmax as my mate is using a 243 as well i have also got a few Barnes TSX for any thing that looks a bit tougher
Ceers

Replies

30 Sep 2015
@ 08:57 pm (GMT)

Paul Yates

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
Brendan, have you read Nathan's .243 page? Lots of info on specific projectiles there!

http://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase/.243+Winchester.html


30 Sep 2015
@ 09:02 pm (GMT)

Paul Yates

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
Sorry I spelled your name wrong...

One thing that seems odd; closer range means higher velocity, which typically leads to quicker expansion, not the opposite. So I find it puzzling that the 85gr Game Kings are not expanding readily at close distance. Certainly anneal them or drill them if Nathan has reported success doing so.
01 Oct 2015
@ 01:03 am (GMT)

Brendon Greig

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
some of the problem may have been caused through a large number of them being young animals with only light bodies chest and neck shots were instant as expected but they tended to start running away once we started shooting "funny that" rear shoulder shots were a bit slower possibly because of soft bones and not enough resistant's
01 Oct 2015
@ 04:19 am (GMT)

jason

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
I'm not sure of your twist but I wouldn't mind betting the amax would work for you. Or if your in n.z try targex projectiles.
Iv seen bullet blow up mentioned in another forum and nobody said they have actual had it happen.
I use .224 and 7mm amax and no problems. If it ever does happen or you think it might as your real close just change you point of aim.
And yes iv used .224 game king which just pin holed at close range too.
Iv found in my limited experience that I havnt found a projectile too soft yet.
01 Oct 2015
@ 05:49 am (GMT)

Warwick Marflitt

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
Get a bigger Cal Gun!!! Problem solved! .30 or bigger. Like with car engines and more Horse Power? There's no substitute for "CUBIC INCHES" Its the cheapest way to increase Horse Power! A bigger bullet going fast is the trick. What makes a bigger mess a Mini Car hitting a house at 100mph or a Kenworth Truck hitting the same said house at 100mph????
Yeah I know Minis are cheaper to buy than KWs But the results speak for themselves...........
01 Oct 2015
@ 05:52 am (GMT)

Warwick Marflitt

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
At a guess and from reading the 243 page in Cartridge knowledge base the Partition would be the one to use? How do they go loaded backwards for close range work????
01 Oct 2015
@ 07:08 am (GMT)

Thomas Kitchen

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
hi brendon
did you autopsy goats and see what exactly happened?
i would be tempted to pull few projectiles and anneal them and put them back this won't cause any change in point of impact.
second thought is if your going to buy new projectiles step up in weight might give you better penetration with soft projectiles.
01 Oct 2015
@ 02:25 pm (GMT)

Bryan Webster

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
Perhaps after drilling and / or annealing those Sierras and using them, you might consider switching to 105 grain Hornady A-Max for longer more open range shots but for those closer shots load the 95 grain Hornady SST.

I have found most of my rifles shoot the combination of equal weights in A-Max and SST bullets to close to the same point of impact, but if there is a difference you might be able to just dial it in for while hinting areas where longer shots are expected.

I have taken to using the 162 grain SST for short range shots in my 7x57 and carry 162 grain A-Max loads for longer shots and it has worked perfectly on white-tailed deer up to elk this year.

Another option for close ranges would be the Barnes 85 grain TSX BT. A guaranteed killer from closer shots out to around 250 meters but I have not used them for any longer shots on animals the size of those you have been culling.
01 Oct 2015
@ 05:05 pm (GMT)

G Dog

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
Apologies for butting in, but Bryan, very interested to hear more about your 7x57 loads. I've recently purchased one and have loaded up some amaxs but have yet to put them through the rifle as its at my gunsmith getting some work done. What im keen to know is velocities, coal (my rifle is long throated ) distances you swap from sst to amax and general performance. Email me or reply here. [email protected]

thanks Bryan,
Grant
01 Oct 2015
@ 07:42 pm (GMT)

Nathan Foster

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
Hi Brendon, if you want to go softer, yes, you can try the V-Max. I can see other good advice in this thread from bullet suggestions to 4 litre engines.

As I have written in the KB, velocity is an important factor when using a small bore. So the first step is to make sure that your loads are up to full speeds. The second aspect is as talked about- shot placement, especially as we lose velocity.

The HP Gameking is a good bullet in its own right. Be sure to study the actual wounding before you completely write it off as I doubt you will be experiencing pin hole wounding unless there is a batch issue.

Sometimes a person tell me that the bullet is not doing its job, but when the person then sets about investigating actual wounding, we sometimes find that the bullet has done as much as it could. So we then have to look at other factors such as the limitations of the cartridge or shot placement. We can always change to a lighter varmint bullet in the .243 for shooting young / light animals but most people are put off by the lack of exit wounding should the same bullet be used on a larger animal that is happened upon unexpectedly. Some people dual load, others will try to find and make peace with one bullet to cover all bases and work on exacting shot placement, others might change calibers. There is much to consider in this regard.
02 Oct 2015
@ 06:22 am (GMT)

Mike Davis

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
.243 not doing enough damage up close on a goat........hmm methinks you wasnt putting bullet into shoulder bones like ya supposed to do......
whack them front wheels out and they fall over and stay fallen over.
Im not a EBRG fan but know damn well it is more than enough gun for goats and should put them down with authority...... the "oldtimers" who have sworn by that cartridge for years shoot through shoulders for best effect...cant find fault with that as I try hard to do the same with .270 for the same reasons.
02 Oct 2015
@ 08:23 am (GMT)

Brendon Greig

Re: Picking bullets for our needs
You could be right with a few shots a bit far back was just a few didn't go down as quick as I thought they should but it was a bit like shooting ants on a ant hill in a few places my mate recond it was piss bowling them will disect a few next trip and have a look would be great to have a comparison site of projectiles rather than trolling brands that all say the same things basically best projectiles since sliced bread Nathan's book long range hunting cartridges has alot of information about them in it but as he says it's more about long range than close to medium it's after reading his books that has got me thinking about it half way through the last book now cheers for the replys though
 

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