cart SHOPPING CART You have 0 items
SELECT CURRENCY

Discussion Forums

1
Search forums
Forum Index > Rifles general discussion > Downsides to Threaded Muzzles

Downsides to Threaded Muzzles

23 Dec 2021
@ 08:28 am (GMT)

Ryan Nafe

Fellas,

This is a question I’ve had for some time now and haven’t seemed to be able to find any solid answers to:

Are there problems that can arise with a threaded muzzle, problems that otherwise wouldn’t be there, with a standard non-threaded one?


The reason I ask is because threaded muzzles have become a very common feature on rifles over the last few years but I have absolutely no need or desire for them. I don’t want a muzzle brake and I don’t want a suppressor, I have no need or interest in either one. Muzzle brakes are very loud and can cause problems with carbon deposits, suppressors are expensive and can cause problems with carbon deposits, neither of them are something I’m interested in.

Given that, are there problems associated with the threaded muzzles that are significant enough to be worth avoiding rifles with that feature?

Thanks,
Ryan

Replies

1
23 Dec 2021
@ 08:39 am (GMT)

Ryan Nafe

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
One last thing, this is honestly just a bit of venting and a check to see if anyone else has the same feeling going on:

I’m getting pretty frustrated with manufacturers putting out otherwise fantastic rifles but putting brakes on them, even mid-weight rifles in very mild cartridges like 6.5 crapmore and .308. It’s a complete waste of time, materials, and the subsequent cost to the consumer. I mean really, under what conditions would anyone think it worthwhile to put an extremely loud spiral-ported brake on a heavy-barreled .308 that already has very mild recoil? What the hell is going on, and who’re the idiots buying a regular weight sporter in 6.5 crapmore with a muzzle brake on it?

Bergara and Tikka are the two worst offenders in this regard, as far as I can tell. Bergara, for example, recently came out with several lines of rifles (wilderness series and some of their pro series rifles) which are quite decent designs, but they needlessly add expense, length, and noise by putting spiral-ported brakes on the rifles. The production cost could easily be down $100 without that mostly needless feature.
23 Dec 2021
@ 02:26 pm (GMT)

Lane Salvato

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
My experience with one rifle with a 5/8” thread has been fine. I don’t remove it except to clean it. I don’t own a muzzle break but the rifle I really wanted just came with it.

I really think it’s market driven unfortunately but I wouldn’t let it stop me from purchasing an otherwise great rifle because of it. You can find them without though if that’s your preference.

I agree that they are largely unnecessary. I love my 338 Win. Mag. It’s muzzle brake free. I’m way older than Nathan but I can honestly say that when it comes to larger elk calibers Nathan taught me how to do it right.
24 Dec 2021
@ 12:22 am (GMT)

Ben Law

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
it seems like most howa's come with threaded muzzles now days.
no, im not a fan really. yes great if you want to screw something on there but i dont.
a lot seem to have a small thread compared to the diameter of the barrel, i hear this can result in swelling at the muzzle and loss of accuracy over time.
24 Dec 2021
@ 03:21 am (GMT)

Lane Salvato

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
Ben, I hadn't considered that notion. Sporter barrel, etc. could be a major issue. My only threaded barrel is on a Remington 700 5R which is a relatively thick barrel. Threading isn't going to do anything to that but I could see a concern if you were using it on a barrel that was already thin, and then you take out more metal at the very end.

24 Dec 2021
@ 08:31 am (GMT)

Ryan Nafe

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
Yeah guys, the thin steel at the muzzle is where I get concerned. If the bore is pretty small diameter (say 7mm or under) and the threads are relatively large, like 5/8-24, there’s probably still enough steel there to not create much of an issue.

But in cases where the steel remaining at the muzzle is not particularly thick, I just wonder if that’s a potential problem. I can’t see it being a net benefit if you’re not gonna use it by putting on a brake or a can, but I’m not sure if that necessarily means it’s likely to cause issues either. Like just because it doesn’t help anything, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll hurt anything either. I just don’t know.
24 Dec 2021
@ 09:24 pm (GMT)

Mike Davis

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
well for around $60 you could simply get rifle recrowned removing threaded bit...loosing why??? 10-15mm over all length..
Im about to have bull barrel done with a 18-1 thread...which I assume is 18mm in diameter...so will have plenty heaps meat around a 5.5mm hole.AND leaving original crown alone.
all my other rifles have std thread 20 tpi 1/2" I believe it is....never had an issue.
25 Dec 2021
@ 01:45 pm (GMT)

David Landwehr

Re: Downsides to Threaded Muzzles
The reduced dia at the muzzle it not so thin that it would cause swelling, even on sporter barrels. This is not a concern.
I'm also of the belief they are not necessary but I do have a rifke with one because it came with it. With modern manufacturing a thread and cap are very cheap to add at the manufacturing stage but expensive to add later. For the few people who want it, its a cheap solution and I don't see it detracting from those who don't want it.
1
 

ABOUT US

We are a small, family run business, based out of Taranaki, New Zealand, who specialize in cartridge research and testing, and rifle accurizing.

store