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Forum Index > Rifles general discussion > Parker Hale 308 Bedding

Parker Hale 308 Bedding

14 Sep 2021
@ 02:53 pm (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

I just picked up a steal of a deal for $200 CND A Parker Hale 308 bolt action with 5 boxes of target ammo and a scope. There was a skid of copper in the barrel and it looks hardly fired. It is going to be my younger son's hunting rifle and I have set about in earnest to accurize it. You can see from the photos that it was lug bedded with no pillars. And a piss poor job at that. I'll be grinding that out.

So from the photos you can see and perhaps help with some decisions I need to make.

1: the sides of the receiver body have a ribbed machining and are slightly vertically radius'ed along their length front to back.
2: the width dimension of the receiver tapers (narrows) from the front of the radius machine work to the back by 0.0185 inches.
3: there are three machine screws from the receiver to the floor. One to an independent tang in beneath the lug. One just behind the magazine opening to the front of the trigger plate and the third from the tang to the back of the trigger plate.
4: the lug's posterior surface has a slight horizontal radius. The transition from the lug to the rest of the action has a rough line of poor machining. and the front machine screw anchors into the centre of the lug.

Questions:
1: Do I do a 2 part bedding to avoid having the taper bust the thin wall of bedding along the sides of the receiver in a full bedding?
2: If I full bed it, do the machining marks along the receiver help and mitigate movement (and splitting)? and in the forepart of the sides of the receiver there is a machined shoulder that if bedded. Will this work for or against accuracy in a full bedding?
3:With the three screw attachment, what comments are there on pillar bedding?

Have a good one everyone,
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Replies

1
14 Sep 2021
@ 03:02 pm (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
oops Lets try that photo thing again


Matt

https://imgur.com/a/ShTltJu
14 Sep 2021
@ 03:05 pm (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
Oh and I forgot to ask one more question. I have a machine shop with a good mill. Should I machine the back of the lug face and clean up the transition to a perfect flat and 90 corner?
15 Sep 2021
@ 09:56 am (GMT)

Nathan Foster

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
Hi Matt, lets see if we can work through a bit of this.

1. First we need to clarify your question (two parts). Did you mean in two steps? If so, my answer is that it is best to try and avoid bedding in two steps. Unfortunately, it is near impossible to perform two step bedding without introducing some form of stress. The entire bedding job should be done in one process. If however you meant 'front and rear' bedding as opposed to full length bedding then yes, you could adopt front and rear bedding as opposed to full length bedding.

Regarding the taper on the action, this is good because it helps center the action in its bedding. Having said this, the radius on a poorly machined (or buffed) action such as this (also CZ) may unfortunately flare out at the bottom creating a trap point. A small level of flare can be buffed out by an experienced polisher / metal worker. A rather more simple approach is to simply use tape along the lower portion during bedding, leaving the upper round of the action to act as a center guide. Once the bedding job has cured, the tape will be destroyed as the action is pulled, but will leave the bedding intact. This obviously works only up to a point. If the flare is very large, a single layer of electrical tape will not be enough on its own.

2. If you want to full bed, go for it. Regarding the rough finish, understand that the action needs to be able to recoil and return to battery as explained in the bedding instructions, in the book series and I think also within some of my videos (Kapiti talk?). A rough finish does not help.

3. It looks like this action is missing its front floating pillar (this set up is much the same as the SMLE). It will pay to have something in there. The main issue with this type of arrangement is that if the pillar is too long, it cause the action to sit above the bedding after the rifle is bedded and reassembled. You may instead prefer to epoxy a pillar in place before bedding. You could also make the top of the pillar flat rather than stepped so that the boss on the action sits on the pillar, rather than inserts into the pillar. The entire pillar can be slightly countersunk into the at the top (eg .2 to .5mm), flush at the bottom. You can then bed the rifle, letting some compound flow over the top of the pillar (note that it will flow over the pillar anyway - so you must factor this into the equation).

Alternatively, you can make a stepped pillar and temporarily attach it to the action, then place both into the mortice, but be aware that you risk air bubbles around the top of the pillar where it meets the lug. To prevent this, apply some compound at the intersection of the pillar and action just before it goes into the mortice.

A floating pillar can be used in the middle. You must be very careful not to flex the stock or action with this middle screw. The pillar must therefore be of a perfect length. If you do not wish to use a middle pillar then be sure to keep middle screw tension no more than about 10 inch-lb (barely more than finger tight). Use Loctite to secure the screw or CRC-SP 400 to basically gum it in place.

4. You can mill the action if you like, it won't do any harm.

Hope that helps a bit. All the best.
15 Sep 2021
@ 03:50 pm (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
Yes Nathan. It helps a ton. Thank you. It’s the confidence on this one i lacked and the points your making have cleared away enough doubt n fear to proceed.

I’ll machine the lug flat for sure.
I’ll check the taper on the sides of the action for a flare towards the back. As far as relieving pinch along the bottom of the length of the action due to the radius of the original machining I’ll either tape it off for post bedding clearance or I’ll machine it true over the length of the sides when I machine out the roughness.
Would eliminating the contact between the middle screw and the action altogether be an option? I could create an internal tang for the middle screw that anchors to the wood internals but sits below the bedding.

As far as the front pillar bedding question. I’ll take your suggestion to machine a pillar with a boss to receive the nut on the bottom of the lug. I’ll machine out the rear half of the pillar boss I’ll machine a 1 or 2 degree slope on the nut of the lug to reduce any binding.

Thanks again Nathan Top shelf advice. I’ll post some more photos as I proceed. I’ve bought your full set of books three times and gifted them to a few hunting buddies and always recommend your site to shooters

matt
16 Sep 2021
@ 06:49 am (GMT)

Nathan Foster

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
Hi Matt, thank you so much for you kind words and ongoing support. That is above and beyond thank you.

Any receiver with a middle screw may flex (action or stock) as the screw is advanced. It is nevertheless possible to tighten a middle screw finger tight and use some for of thread locker combined with the floor plate to keep it place.

If you want to, you could try making some form of fixture in the stock so that it assembles more like an M700 ADL. But you do not have to go to this length if you do not want to.

A further note: I did not see the trigger unit in the photo. If this is the large trigger unit which sits on the rear pillar, common to this action and the Santa Barbara, you will need to bed the action with the trigger in place (front and rear bedding - not full length). The trigger will need to be attached to the tang and the sides and rear taped off with electrical tape, then simply apply a small blob of bedding at the tang of the stock. Its not the best set up but it will work.

Here is an old vid (what a rough back country accent I had!), Parker Hale .30-06:

https://youtu.be/EmFfqotE1v8
16 Sep 2021
@ 02:06 pm (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
Great Vid.
I wish here in Alberta, where I live shooting could be of that sort. Open expanses in the mountains. I have to drive 2 1/2 hr to get to that sort of terrain.

Anyway, I'll get some more pictures up

https://imgur.com/a/P7KtgPL
16 Sep 2021
@ 02:37 pm (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
https://imgur.com/a/AdohU7L
26 Sep 2021
@ 06:06 am (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
Some progress pictures

I set up the stock in the milling machine level n square then used a wood router bit to do the work

https://imgur.com/a/AdohU7L
26 Sep 2021
@ 06:08 am (GMT)

Matthew Morrison

Re: Parker Hale 308 Bedding
sorry wrong photo link

try this one

https://imgur.com/a/Uxh1yUM[b]
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