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.375 Holland & Holland Magnum

History

Of the many rifles, shotguns and cartridges designed by the English gun making firm Holland & Holland, the .375 Holland & Holland cartridge introduced in 1912 is easily this company’s most recognized achievement. In order to better understand the development of the .375 H&H, a brief study of the history of African game hunting helps reveal cartridge design influences.

Prior to full colonization of the African continent, particularly the early to mid 1800’s, hunting arms of European pioneers in Africa included muzzle loaded rifled muskets of between .577” and .75” caliber as well as smooth bore guns. Smooth bores ranged in size from 12 bore, equivalent to the modern 12 gauge (.720”) through to 10, 8, 6 and 4 bore. Hunters would use a single heavy solid lead ball in the smooth bore for large game and buckshot (3-4 balls) for lesser game. The 4 bore was the largest of the smooth bore hunting arms in use on the continent. Primarily used for hunting large dangerous game, the 4 bore fired a .955” 1600-1850 grain lead round ball at around 1300fps. These early arms were generally adequate at close ranges but slow to reload.

Breech loading firearms utilizing brass cased cartridges first began to appear during the mid 1860’s. At this time, projectiles and black powder charge weights generally stayed the same as the original muzzle load weights. The 4 bore for example, still fired a 1600-1850 grain projectile at 1300fps but with the same charge now held in a brass case. From 1870 through to 1890, popular African breech loading cartridges among British hunters (due simply to availability) included the .577/.450 Martini-Henry, .450 Gibbs, .450 BP Express, .500/450 No.2 Musket, 500 BP Express, and the 4 bore now in double barrel configuration.

The firearms industry experienced major technological advancements during the 1880’s including the invention of smokeless powder and magazine fed bolt action rifles. By the 1890’s hunting practices on the great continent had, in a general manner of speaking, become divided into three categories.

The first category of hunter included farmers and colonists of humble means who adopted moderate power rifles in such calibers as the 7x57 Mauser, .303 British, 8x57 Mauser and 9.3x57. As for rifle designs, the Mauser system was definitely preferred over the Lee-Metford which had a reputation of producing poor accuracy.

A second category of hunting practice was that of the affluent Gentleman. These hunters typically carried fine sporting arms firing cartridges specifically designed to tackle large game. By 1898 the most popular African sporting caliber for the British gentleman was the .450 Nitro Express. This rimmed, double rifle cartridge utilized cordite powder and a jacketed 480 grain bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2150fps. The .450 NE would eventually serve as the benchmark for African dangerous game cartridges, having a major influence on later designs including the .458 Winchester Magnum (500gr .458” bullet at 2040fps). About the only downsides to the .450 NE were its high recoil and steep trajectory.

The third type of hunter was the professional Ivory and meat hunter. When hunting Elephant, these men sought maximum stopping power and the .450/.400 Jeffery introduced in 1896 quickly became a favorite cartridge. The .450/400 Jeffery featured a tough, heavy walled case (to prevent any risk of sticky extraction) and drove a 400 grain bullet at 2100fps. The .400” caliber produced a slightly flatter trajectory than the .450” caliber cartridges making the .450/400 Jeffery a more versatile cartridge across open ground although the cartridge was essentially designed for maximum stopping power at close to moderate ranges.

By the turn of the century some interesting factors in African cartridge performance were becoming clear, bore diameters appeared to range in the extreme with military small bores at one end of the scale and hefty recoiling .400-.500” dangerous game calibers at the other extreme with little in between. To this end both English and European cartridge designers experimented heavily with ‘medium’ bores. German designers made the greatest breakthroughs based on their ongoing experience with the 9.3 bore. In 1905 German gun maker Otto Bock released the 9.3x62, a mild recoiling, relatively flat shooting cartridge capable of producing deep penetration on large game chambered in the highly affordable M98 Mauser rifle. The 9.3x62 was a huge success and became a standard African hunting cartridge, especially for Boer farmers and hunters of humble means. Furthermore, the Boers had developed a deep bond with the Mauser rifle system during the second Boer war (1899-1902).

Throughout all of these developments the British firm Holland & Holland was establishing a reputation for producing fine sporting arms. In 1904 the firm released a radically new cartridge case design, the rimless belted cartridge. This case design allowed for positive head spacing of the cartridge on the belt rather than on the shoulder of the cartridge, a useful aspect for a cartridge firing a bullet nearly as wide as its case body with little shoulder, or rather, a very long and shallow sloping shoulder. The H&H case also featured a long taper to help minimize the risk of cases sticking after firing, a situation that could (and did) prove disastrous when hunting dangerous game. The rimless case head also allowed Holland & Holland to adopt the popular Mauser M98 action system which did not feed traditional rimmed cartridges particularly well. For their new belted cartridge, Holland & Holland chose the 9.5mm (.375”) caliber. This caliber had been in use in the U.S for some time in some very popular black powder cartridges such as the .38-40 and the later .38-55. However the U.S cartridges were designed to fire lighter weight projectiles at low velocity, an entirely different cartridge design from an earlier era. Holland & Holland named their new cartridge the .400/.375 Belted Nitro Express and loaded it with a 270 grain bullet at 2150fps. Unfortunately, the .400/.375 failed to gain any popularity, English gentry found the H&H cartridge offered no advantages over existing cartridges while continental European colonists/hunters had a superior powered cartridge available at an affordable price in the form of Otto Bock's 9.3x62.

With no future for the .400/.375, Holland & Holland sought to create a superior medium bore cartridge design boasting high velocity.

The experiences of John Rigby mirrored those of Holland & Holland during this time frame. Rigby released his medium bore 450/350 Rigby cartridge (.358”) in 1899. This fired a hefty 310 grain bullet but at a moderate 2000fps. Then in 1908, Rigby released the very fine .350 Rigby along with a rimmed version (for break open rifles) called the .350 Rigby No.2. These cartridges fired a 225 grain bullet at 2600fps. Although this cartridge did not go on to achieve major fame, the .350 Rigby would go down in history as a pleasant to shoot medium bore cartridge.

In the mean time, Holland & Holland continued working towards a medium bore capable of firing relatively heavy bullets at high velocities. Finally, in 1912, Holland & Holland released their new cartridge, the .375 Holland and Holland Nitro Express Magnum. From its introduction the .375 H&H Magnum was far different to any other cartridge in use on the great continent: a flat shooting cartridge with ammunition available in three different bullet weights to suit game of all sizes. The .375 did not fire extremely heavy bullets as would be expected from a dedicated dangerous game cartridge however it was a true all-rounder and with modest recoil too.

Following British tradition, the .375 H&H was introduced as a proprietary cartridge meaning that ammunition could only be made under a license agreement with Holland & Holland. Kynoch initially produced .375 H&H factory ammunition, these loads including a fast expanding 235 grain bullet at 2800fps, a mid weight 270 grain bullet at 2650fps and 300 grain soft point or solid bullets at 2500fps. Holland & Holland also designed a rimmed version of the .375 Magnum for their double rifles. This cartridge was called the .375 Flanged Nitro Express Magnum however it never gained the popularity of the original cartridge in its versatile repeating bolt action configuration.

The .375 H&H soon gained an enviable reputation. But as much as the .375 was proving to be an excellent performer on game, only a few wealthy hunters could afford Holland & Holland rifles.

Two years after its introduction, the First World War brought a halt to African game hunting as a sport, practically eliminating the demand for the .375 H&H cartridge. After the war, the .375 H&H regained popularity but for most hunters, the cost of a .375 H&H rifle was still out of reach. Finally, in 1925, Holland & Holland released the .375 from its proprietary status. Following this, the .375 H&H gained a steady following throughout the colonies of Africa but the cartridge still lagged behind the 9.3x62 in overall usage.

The .375 H&H experienced a huge boost in popularity when, in1937, Winchester released its Model 70 Winchester chambered for both the .375 H&H and .300 H&H (introduced in 1925) Magnum cartridges. Although some custom rifle makers had produced .375 H&H rifles in the U.S, a model 70 Winchester could now be purchased for less than a quarter of the price of a custom rifle. The .375 H&H was perfectly suited to North America’s largest game including Alaskan Moose and Brown Bear.

The Second World War brought further changes. Although the war once again halted usage of the .375 H&H as a sporting cartridge in Africa, Allied bombings of German munitions factories sent the 9.3x62 into near obsolescence. When peace returned, the abundance of .375 H&H ammunition and inexpensive rifles such as the Winchester Model 70 and (later) the Brno ZKK 602 (now CZ 550 magnum) firmly established the .375 H&H Magnum as a major all-round big game cartridge. The .375 H&H received a further boost in popularity during the 1950’s when African outfitters promoted hunting opportunities to U.S hunters. The lure of African game attracted a constant flow of U.S hunters, many carrying .375 H&H caliber rifles.

Today, the .375 H&H Magnum is utilized as an all-round cartridge. It is used by hunters from all walks of life in many countries around the world. The .375 H&H is used throughout Europe for game up to the size of Moose and Russian Boar and Bear. In Africa, Brno / CZ rifles chambered in .375 H&H are a common sight. This cartridge is also a very common choice amongst Alaskan Guides and their clients, a sound choice for hunting Bear, Moose and sheer dynamite on Elk. In Australia, the .375 H&H is a popular choice for Sambar and a standard caliber for hunting scrub bulls (wild cattle), Asian Water Buffalo and Banteng. In New Zealand the .375 H&H is also used for wild cattle, Sambar and anything else that takes the hunter's fancy.

The .375 H&H is significantly important in cartridge history due to the fact that it became the parent case design for many 20th century high capacity magnum cartridges. Many would consider this to be most unfortunate as rather than simply adopt the case capacity of the .375 H&H, companies also adopted the H&H belt. This feature was useful on the parent .375 due to its heavily tapered case and shallow shoulder angle, however modern cartridges with less body taper and sharper shoulders did not really need this. Nevertheless, the belt stayed on for marketing purposes to symbolize power. The word Magnum was also taken from the .375 H&H and used to emphasize high velocity, a word which has since become standard terminology within the arms industry to describe high speed cartridges. It did not take long for consumers to be educated into believing that a magnum cartridge meant a cartridge of such power that it had to have a ‘reinforcing belt’ at the case head. Nevertheless, the belt on the magnums can prove useful, especially when creating wildcat cartridges, utilizing the belt during initial forming.
 

Performance

The .375 H&H Magnum is a very useful medium bore cartridge. So much so that it could be regarded as underutilized. During the latter part of 1980’s and early 1990’s a trend appeared where many hunters felt compelled to buy .375 H&H caliber rifles as sentimental pieces. Such rifles were often regarded by their owners as “armchair” rifles, an interesting piece in a collection which might never be used other than to fuel the imagination. Many of these hunters would consider the .375 H&H to be ‘too much gun’ for medium game, yet to say such a thing is to miss the point of its design. The .375 H&H was designed for those needing one gun to cover a variety of situations - not just for heavy game. In fact, as a heavy game cartridge, the .375 H&H is at the lower end of the power spectrum.

These factors aside, the .375 H&H has in more recent years seen greater use on medium game to the point that far more medium game are taken with this cartridge than large heavy game. Yet as a twist of irony, bullet makers such as Hornady have of late rationalized their product lines, removing medium game bullets from their line-up. Miscommunications have also been a major factor; for example, bullet makers seldom offered game usage guides as now appears on the packets of some brands of ammunition. Instead, hunters simply assumed that all .375” bullets ‘must’ be suitable for heavy game. After witnessing far different results, bullet makers would receive very curt letters or emails of reprimand. The easy answer was simply to remove these bullet lines. This has unfortunately affected the versatility of the .375 H&H Magnum.

As a light medium game cartridge, the .375 loaded with lightly constructed conventional soft point bullets has the potential to produce excellent results with room for error. But as at the time of writing, light game bullet options have become slim. Generally speaking, the current range of conventional soft point bullets enable the .375 to give fast kills on lean game out to moderate ranges with room for shot placement error. But as velocity falls to around 2200fps, rear lung shots using heavy or stoutly constructed conventional bullet designs may produce delayed kills as a result of poor energy transfer. On the other hand, it is not uncommon for game to travel only a short distance before succumbing to blood loss, a very good result compared to some of the heavy and stout bullets in the smaller bores. At 2000fps, shot placement tends to become much more critical, regardless of game body weights. This could easily be overcome if at least one bullet maker would resume furnishing a 225 grain .375” bullet.

The .375 produces very fast kills on lean game when loaded with round nosed bullets but again, options are now limited since the discontinuation of the Hornady round nose.

On light animals, stout premium .375 bullets can cleave to their momentum and produce delayed kills with rear lung shots. Conventional projectiles are the most effective choice for producing wide wounding as a means to overcome human error. Those who wish to use core bonded bullets on lean game are advised to keep shots well forwards, aiming to break bone. Furthermore, a round nose bullet design can help maximize energy transfer and prevent long dead runs.

On large bodied medium game weighing up to 320kg or 700lb (e.g. Sambar or Elk), loaded with conventional projectiles, the .375 H&H is a first-class cartridge. Bullet designs such as the Interlock and GameKing may shed weight and not live up to ‘Cape Buffalo’ expectations but are extremely well suited to many large bodied game species, dumping vast amounts of energy and producing very clean kills.

When used on large, tough bodied game, a premium bullet can prove extremely effective. Core bonded bullet designs work particularly well on game weighing up to 450kg (1000lb). However at extended ranges, a conventional bullet which sheds weight such as the Sierra Gameking can prove to be more emphatic. For bear or moose, a compromise bullet such as the Nosler Partition can produce the best balance of wounding versus penetration where both close and longer range shots are to be expected. As always, optimal performance comes as a result of matching both bullet weights and bullet construction to game weights and ranges – four vital factors.

When used on large and heavy game, the .375 H&H is, in my experience, to be considered a moderate cartridge. The H&H is able to utilize long and heavy bullets capable of excellent penetration, however even when this cartridge is used at close ranges, impact velocities are generally low. Such impact velocities certainly aid penetration but are not conducive to high nervous trauma in the form of hydrostatic shock (see Game Killing section) which often leads to slow kills with shoulder shots. I am sure many others would disagree with my findings however having thoroughly tested this bore diameter on heavy game through to impact velocities of 2950fps, I cannot ignore these differences in speed of incapacitation.

Perhaps the most distressing problem with this bore is unrealistic expectations. Unfortunately, a proportion of hunters simply expect every single .375 caliber bullet to be suitable for heavy game and are quick to complain when they discover ‘soft bullets’ that have failed to kill several feet of wet stacked newspaper, eager to announce their ignorance to any that will hear. Were bullet makers to accommodate this, it would decrease the versatility of this bore among those who wish to use the .375 across a wide range of game body weights. Hunters have already lost a good number of soft bullet options and should take care not to lose anymore. As a further irony, this cartridge can at times produce far better results when a neck shot is taken with the frangible Gameking than it does with a premium bullet and body shot.

The .375 H&H produces moderate recoil compared to faster bores or wider bores of equal speed. Having said this and depending on one’s experience levels, first impressions when shooting the .375 at a range are often that of high recoil. But as the shooter becomes more relaxed, isolating the muscle groups that need to be held at tension versus those that should be relaxed, the hunter can learn to roll comfortably with recoil. As with all large calibers, if the rifle is to be scoped, the optic should have generous eye relief to prevent flinching or physical injury. A light crisp trigger is also important, more so than on a lighter caliber.

Regarding the Brno /CZ rifle: famous African hunting guide, the late Peter Hathaway Capstick gave good accounts of the advantages of using the true 4 + 1 capacity Brno / CZ rifle. Although Capstick enjoyed many big game cartridges, if a client wounded a large dangerous animal that had to be tracked into dense bush, Capstick often used his .375. Five shots were loaded into the rifle along with pockets full of loose ammunition. A fleeting glimpse here and there, shots between glimpses, a barrage of less than ideally placed shots due to the demands of the situation, until finally it was all over.

The modern CZ rifle is roughly of the same quality as any other mid-priced firearm. Many shoot exceptionally well out of the box, others need work. The outer polishing is generally high but has no bearing on internal tolerances. In my experience, the basic action design of the magnum rifle is superb, a great foundation for any heavy magnum including those intended to be used at long ranges. The action is both broad in diameter but also extra long in magazine capacity (98mm / 3.858” internal length). As a side note, this is the action that NZ gun writer Graeme Henry used to build the world’s first .338 Lapua Magnum sporting rifle (see Practical Guide To Long Range Hunting Cartridges). As for the barrel, I have found that the smaller the bore and higher the velocity, the more finicky these barrels can be. Fortunately, the .375 caliber barrel is generally exempt from any major flaws.

The wooden stock of the Brno / CZ rifle is pitched to be used with both open sights and optics but leans more towards the use of open sights. If a scope is fitted, the stock pitch can accentuate felt recoil, especially with regards to the Lux model which looks as if it has been test fired by Uri Geller. On the other hand, if a high and straight comb is utilized for scoped shooting, it can be very hard to use open sights in an emergency. In any case, those who wish to shoot ‘mostly’ with a scope may appreciate a straight recoiling stock design while those who prefer open sights may appreciate some drop. Hunters wishing to utilize the Brno / CZ magnum action for long range prone shooting will most definitely prefer a straight pitched stock. Please note that Bell & Carlson now produce a small range of stocks to suit the CZ, each featuring an aluminum chassis which does away with the need for a second recoil lug (discussed ahead).

To fully exploit the accuracy potential of the Brno / CZ rifle, it should be properly bedded using a steel based epoxy resin (such as our MatchGrade bedding compound) which can cope with heavy magnums. I am no great fan of the second recoil lug system which can be found on the barrel of many of these rifles. This second lug does help prevent the stock from swelling at the magazine well and splitting under recoil in its basic factory rifle form but is in no way on par with cross bolts (or simple cross screws) and steel based epoxy bedding which achieves strength while enhancing accuracy potential. Many of these rifles also feature a third screw within the forend, pulling the barrel down and locking it in place. A locked barrel can be very accurate (e.g target rifles with ‘blocked’ barrels) however in a wood stocked rifle, the POI can shift over time due to stock warping. This method of anchoring the barrel can place a good deal of stress on the entire system. It should be no surprise to anyone with some measure of gunsmithing or engineering aptitude that such a system can both work exceptionally well but also fail miserably depending on the fit of each individual barrel within each forend. Unfortunately, die-hard fans of the CZ rifle tend to voice their enthusiasm for the big rifles so loudly that those who own poorly shooting rifles as a result of such ills often blame themselves when their cannon does not live up to the legends.
 

CZ barrel lug rebate

The CZ 550M barrel assembly, showing the forend scew anchor and barrel lug rebate. The rear sight ramp is mounted to the top of this assembly.

CZ barrel lug

The barrel channel recoil lug.

CZ 550 magnum stock WL

The excellent Bell & Carlson Varmint stock, designed for the CZ550M.

The CZ rifle works very well with a free floated barrel. The wood stock is not overly strong but with cross screws or bolts (or a stronger aftermarket stock) combined with steel based epoxy bedding, accuracy can be very good. As a contrast to this, those who wish to attempt to bed the CZ with its barrel lug in place may be in for a world of hurt. When bedding all the way from the action to the leaf sights, the bedding area is so long that one can easily flex the forend during the cure, resulting in a stressed bedding job. It is also very hard to guarantee the alignment of a fixed lug (at the action) and a floating lug (many CZ rifles utilize a floating secondary lug), both at the same time. A compromise, is to create a more easily aligned secondary lug by cutting a small piece of steel and to temporarily glue this to the barrel lug recess during bedding, after which the glue bond breaks, leaving the lug correctly aligned in the epoxy bedding. But again, it is very difficult to bed over such a great distance without inducing some level of stress within the system. Two step bedding (receiver bedding followed by barrel channel as a separate operation) is generally disastrous as it is near impossible to have two separate areas of bedding without one placing stress on the other. It is for these reasons that rifle barrels are generally fully free floated rather than fully bedded. It is also equally difficult to prevent a wood stock forend from warping over time. Even with bedding, a forend may eventually develop some stress which is hard to eliminate over such a great length.
 

As for scope mounts, I am no fan of the common vertical split rings commonly found on these rifles. It is all too easy to bend or crush a scope fitted to a Brno or CZ rifle in this manner. The mounting surfaces of these rifles are not always true while split rings cannot be lapped to suit. Two fixes for this include the EGW picatinny rail, allowing the use of basic weaver style rings. Another option is the Burris Long Action CZ Style ring set (Part No. 420130) which mount directly on to the Brno / CZ receiver and can be lapped if needed.

Rifle and optical issues aside, the key to success with these big guns is practice. It is far too common to see both hunters and guides lacking experience with these larger bores. Those who feel that the .375 H&H produces too much recoil for regular practice merely highlight their own lack of experience. The real gold lies in getting to know such rifles inside and out, working on the rifle, testing a variety of loads, practicing at 100 yards and then out to 300 yards or further while learning to shoot from various positions. With experience, recoil becomes non-existent and a point is reached where the hunter fully understands that the .375 H&H is a tool of modest power rather than some untamed beast of fantasy.
 

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Factory ammunition

Current factory loads from Winchester include the 300 grain Nosler Partition at 2530fps and the 300 grain Nosler (monolithic) Solid at 2530fps. Both yield around 2460fps in the 25” barreled CZ rifle. As a side note, previous loads included the 270 and 300 grain Winchester Fail Safe bullets at true velocities of around 2600 and 2470fps respectively. In testing, these bullets produced excellent penetration but not a great level of trauma. The current loads from Winchester are very basic premium loads. The 300 grain Partition is a generally good bullet. It works acceptably well at close to moderate ranges on lean game and works exceptionally well on large non dangerous game out to impact velocities of 2200fps and 1800fps with great care. On heavy bodied game (bovines), this bullet capable of rendering a very wide wound while having a relatively high SD as a means to ensure adequate penetration, minimizing the risk of tumbling on heavy round ball joints. It is not however fault free and lacks the reliability of a core bonded bullet. Hunters who use the line of the leg as their POA will not generally see any problems with the Partition. But those (such as myself) who stalk heavy game to very close ranges and aim forwards of the line of the leg to break ball joints may on very rare occasions find that this bullet arrests or comes apart. Again, this is very rare and generally only occurs with low SD partition bullets, however it important that hunters are made aware of possible limitations. The Partition certainly imparts more energy than tougher bullets if used at extended ranges. To this end, readers are urged to see the limitations of the Partition as actual limitations and not weaknesses in the design which need to be ‘fixed’, a case of being careful what you wish for.

The Winchester Solid bullet can be used either as a stand-alone load for shooting heavy game (CNS shots) or as insurance following a first shot with the Partition. But this of course depends very much on whether one's rifle will print the two loads relatively close together. There is little more to be said here, the solid being designed for all out penetration.

Federal currently offer a confusing array or loads that could be considered a form of torture as a shopping experience. These loads include the 250 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claw (TBBC) at 2670fps, the basic conventional 270 grain Power-Shok soft point at 2690fps, the 300 grain Power-Shok soft point at 2530fps, the 300 grain Trophy Bonded Sledgehammer Solid at 2440fps, the 300 grain Nosler Partition at 2440fps, the 300 grain Swift A-Frame at 2450fps, the 300 grain TBBC at 2400fps and a hot 300 grain TBBC load at 2600fps (formerly known as a +P load). Federal now also load the 300 grain Woodleigh Hydrostatically Stabilized Solid bullet at 2500fps. These loads are generally close to advertised speeds but can show minor discrepancies of 40 to 70fps.

The Federal line up leans mostly towards heavy game usage and many hunters rely on this ammunition when heading to Africa. The exception to the heavy game loads are the two conventional Power-Shok (formerly Hi-Shok) loads. Note - these bullets are round nosed, ideal for light through to larger bodied medium game. This type of load vastly increases the versatility of the .375 H&H, enabling it to perform in exactly the manner it was designed – to work well on a wide range of game body weights, not just heavy game. Both offer very rapid energy transfer with the potential to produce hydrostatic shock down to impact velocities of 2200fps. Below 2200fps, performance is somewhat more modest and killing can be described as clean but delayed, though dead runs are generally short. Below 2000fps, shot placement becomes somewhat more critical as a means to prevent longer dead runs. Both bullets reach their limit at around 1800fps. About the only downside to these offerings is that the two bullets are of a very similar weight. It would be nice to see a 225 grain pointed bullet here for the sake of reach. Having said this, the current round nose loads can be used in conjunction with other like weight premium bullets (for heavy game) without major differences in POI. The two round nose loads are truly useful for hunters requiring a load to cover light through to large bodied medium game out to moderate ranges. It is a shame that at the time of writing, hand loaders do not have many similar options.

The TBBC bullet is an excellent design. This bullet does its best work on heavy game when used at close ranges or impact velocities above 2400fps. Between 2400fps and 2200fps, the TBBC is capable of producing both acceptable wounding and penetration but does not boast great trauma potential. Hunters are advised to stalk close to ensure impact velocities remain above 2400fps and never lower than 2200fps unless taking finishing shots. The 250 and 270 grain loads along with the 300 grain +P load can each be utilized in this manner. Others may be happy to use these loads at lower impact velocities however I much prefer to use these with style, driving the TBBC through heavy bone. The same can be said of the 300 grain Woodleigh Hydrostastically Stabilized Solid which features a truncated meplat as a means to initiate disproportionate to caliber wounding. But again, in my experience, any such bullet design is best used at closer ranges where velocity is high as a means to increase hydraulic forces. Personally, I do not know why the word hydrostatic is attached to this bullet when its ability to wound is so reliant on hydraulic forces. In any case, hydraulic force combined with stability are the two factors that Woodleigh are very much concerned with. For those who need a deep and straight penetration bullet to tackle the very largest of game, this is it.

Current loads from Hornady include the 250 grain GMX Superformance load at 2890fps, the 270 grain Interlock at 2700fps, the 270 grain Superformance SP-RP (Recoil Proof) at 2800fps, the 300 grain DGX (steel jacket soft point) at 2530fps and the 300 grain DGS (Dangerous Game Solid) at 2530fps. The Hornady Superformance loads are generally close to advertised speeds.

The two 270 grain soft point loads are a very basic, conventional design. The RP version differs from the traditional Interlock due to its protected point rather than an exposed lead tip. Apart from this, both produce similar performance. The Superformance load has some advantage with regards to production of nervous trauma, even if the nervous trauma range extension is somewhat short. Both loads work extremely well when used on light to medium game at close to moderate ranges. Expansion on impact is extremely fast and exit wounds are often very large and can be up to 3-4” in diameter when used at closer ranges. On heavily raking shots the Interlock is acceptable for light to mid weight game but can be somewhat lacking if hunting larger body weights due to eventual jacket / core separation. In plain terms, the 270 grain bullets are useful on game up to 320kg with all but tail on shots. For those wanting a general all-round load for use on non-dangerous game, the Interlock options can be very handy. These bullets produce very wide internal wounding, allowing some room for shot placement error. Having said this, wounding does taper off down range and hunters must be mindful of shot placement at impact velocities below 2200fps.

The 250 grain GMX load can prove very useful on large bodied game. This load is unique in that it makes use of a deep penetrating bullet design but at velocity which can be exploited in a more meaningful manner. This is a very good bullet weight for the .375 caliber relative to the homogenous copper style of bullet design. Provided the hunter can stalk to a relatively close range, the GMX, depending on exact game body weights, can (but not always) offer some degree of nervous trauma. Even from a ‘slow barrel’ rifle yielding 2800fps, a hunter that can stalk to within 100 yards of a bovine can expect an impact velocity of 2600fps. Having said this, once the impact velocity of 2600fps is reached, all bets are off. The higher the impact velocity the better (and again I am sure many would disagree, parroting the old “2400fps is best” argument). Once the GMX (or any .375” pill) breaks 2600fps, expect delayed killing with shoulder shots on game weighing 600kg (1300lb) and heavier, and depending on the tenacity of the species.

When using the GMX to shoulder shoot heavy game, hunters are again advised to keep shots well forwards on the shoulder. For those who are patient, a lightly quartering on shot can prove the best, aiming to strike the point of the shoulder and break bone as a means to maximize wounding potential.

The heavy loads from Hornady were, up until October 2017, relatively basic designs. The 300 grain DGX has replaced the 300 grain Interbond which was a somewhat unreliable bullet, its brass jacket sometimes shattering on impact. The second bullet was simply a cup and core steel jacketed bullet. Many readers will already be familiar with this type of bullet having used Russian made steel jacketed soft point ammunition in lesser calibers. This particular bullet design was acceptable for larger animals but really needed some form of core bonding. The third bullet (Oct 2017) features the missing core bonding. Unfortunately, I have not yet tested this bullet but hold very high hopes for it.

Hornady’s 300 grain DGS (solid) bullet is also steel clad (currently unbonded). Designed to be used for taking CNS shots on the heaviest of game. This is a bullet that simply gets the job done when used accordingly.

Remington currently offer just one load for the .375 H&H featuring a 270 grain round nose soft point at 2690fps. For a time, Remington utilized the Hornady Interlock for this loading however this bullet has since been discontinued. Whether Remington continue to buy bulk batches or choose to change loads remains to be seen. The 270 grain round nose is a very basic conventional bullet design but can prove immensely useful due to its blunt round nose form which encourages energy transfer across a wide range of game weights including light or lean bodied deer. From true muzzle velocities of around 2600-2620fps, this load does its best work inside 150 yards or 2200fps. Below 2200fps, kills on lean game can be delayed but this bullet is more effective than typical pointed bullet designs and can be used with great success down to impact velocities of 1800fps or 250 yards. The 270 grain soft point load is not suitable for body shooting heavy dangerous game but is a good choice for hunting large bodied deer in tight conditions. This is yet another bullet that one could complain about as ‘not being tough enough’ but should it become obsolete (and this may well happen), it would decrease the versatility of this bore for those who simply wish to use their .375s on medium game.

Nosler currently produce four loads for the .375 H&H which include the 260 grain Accubond at 2750fps, the 260 grain Partition also at 2750fps, the 300 grain Accubond at 2450fps and finally the 300 grain Partition at 2450fps.

Although the Accubond has its uses, the .375 caliber bullets require extra caution. On lean game, the Accubond bullets can work well at close ranges but tend to cleave to their energy when used at extended ranges (below 2400fps). On heavy game, penetration is quite simply abysmal. These bullets are however acceptable for use on larger bodied deer and antelope, creating very deep and broad wounds at close to moderate ranges. Do not for a moment think this core bonded bullet design is suitable for heavy game weights of 600kg (1320lb) and above as killing can be very slow and cruel.

The Nosler Partition bullets are now very much tried and true. The most important factor is matching bullet weights to game weights (or more accurately, sectional densities to game weights). If the bullet is too short and encounters extremely heavy bone, there is a risk that the bullet will shed its rear core, something I have seen many times. The 260 grain Partition is best suited to game weighing up to 450kg (1000lb) while the 300 grain bullet can handle bovines and is far more emphatic than the Accubond, although it is not the best choice for extremely heavy body weights. When hunting extremely heavy bodied bovines, I prefer a core bonded Woodleigh pill or a homogenous copper bullet, especially with regards to my general point of aim. This topic is addressed further in the hand loading section of this text.

Another brand of ammunition that is worth a brief mention is the Prvi 300 grain round nose bullet, advertised at 2540fps (expect velocities of 2400fps). Like the Remington and Federal loads, the round nose bullet profile and basic cup and core design makes this a good choice for hunting light to large bodied deer in tight cover. Used inside 150 yards, this can be a very fast killing load and is a lot easier on the wallet than other brands.

U.S readers will note that I have neglected some brands of .375 H&H ammunition currently available within your shores. Take note that the hand loading section contains a great deal more info on a wider range of projectiles, taking the bullet designs featured in these loads into account.

 

Hand loading

Like factory ammunition, brass and component bullets for the .375 H&H are commonly available throughout the world. Medium burn rate powders including IMR4064 and Hodgdon Varget (ADI 2208) tend to prove the most potent when seeking full power loads with light weight bullets. Slower burning IMR4350 and H4350 (ADI 2209) or N204 powders prove most effective behind bullets weighing 250 grains and heavier although this burn rate can also display equally desirable performance with light bullet weights. The 4350 burn rate is truly versatile across a wide range of medium bore magnums.

Top velocities for a .375 H&H with 24-25” barrel include 2900fps with 225-235 grain bullets, 2800fps with 250 grain bullets, 2750fps with 260 grain bullets, 2700fps with 270 grain bullets, 2600fps with 300 grain bullets and 2400fps with 350 grain bullets. These velocities are around 100fps higher than Holland & Holland’s original loads. I am a definite believer in chasing the last 100fps in the .375 H&H however not at the expense of accuracy and not in such a way that climatic changes (temperature increases) might cause dangerous pressures. Those who wish to chase velocity must make sure that you are still well within safe operating pressures with some leeway for temperature fluctuations.

Starting with the Sierra bullet line up, options include the 200 grain flat point (designed for the .375 Winchester), the 250 grain Gameking and the 300 grain Gameking. All three can prove very useful. Sierra also produce a 350 grain Matchking (SMK) for long range match.

The 200 grain flat point is not in any way designed to be used in the H&H but it can be put to use and driven relatively high velocities, accuracy limits being dictated more by the standard 1:12 twist rate than pressures (sweet spots occur between 2800 and 2900fps). From a muzzle velocity of 2850fps, the flat point can be loaded to shoot 3” high at 100 yards for a 225 yard zero and is roughly 3” low at 260 yards. At this range, the flat point is pretty much at the end of its road, breaking 1800fps. Below 1800fps, wounding is rather narrow and kills can be slow, especially if there is some wind drift error (in a 10mph wind, drift is roughly 1 foot at 250 yards). The reader may by now be asking why use such a load? In plain terms, this is a fast expanding bullet, ideal for hunting lean game. Recoil is moderate and so it helps ensure one's .375 is being put to use, not gathering dust. The Sierra flat point is normally launched from the .375 Winchester at around 2200fps and is therefore designed with a soft construction in order to expand at low impact velocities of between 2000 and 1800fps (50 and 100 yards). And while the .375 Winchester is effective, its performance is modest. When handloaded to high but not ultra high speeds, this bullet can be vastly more emphatic while providing adequate penetration. This is a great bullet for snap shooting game at woods ranges, resulting in very wide wounds that can make up for some degree of shot placement error.

The .375 Gameking projectiles feature jackets which are almost twice as thick as regular Gameking projectiles. Both are drawn thin (regular Gameking jacket thickness) at the ogive in order to promote full expansion. The cores feature a high antimony content for additional control. At close to moderate ranges, these bullets work well on light or lean game but as velocities fall below 2400fps but more especially below 2200fps, kills can be delayed, the bullets being too tough, meeting little resistance to arrest momentum. There is room here for Sierra to produce a 225 grain bullet for lean game.

As can be expected with such thick jackets, the 250 and 300 grain bullets excel on large body weights including Elk and Moose. Under these conditions, the Gameking dumps vast amounts of energy creating very broad wounds and is somewhat forgiving of wind drift error. Both are useful for shooting out to extended ranges. As an elk bullet, the 250 grain Sierra can be loaded to velocities of around 2800fps and be put to use out to ranges of around 450 yards.

The 300 grain Gameking is designed for very large thin-skinned game. If used on heavy bodied thick-skinned game such as bovines, the performance of the 300 grain Gameking depends entirely on hunting methods and shot placement. Neck shots are fine, meat saver shots (behind the shoulder) produce acceptable results but killing can be delayed as a result of low energy levels (no fault of the bullet) and follow up shots are generally required. In contrast to this, shoulder shots taken at close ranges can cause over expansion and limited penetration on bodyweights of around 600kg (1300lb). It is therefore hard for me to recommend the 300 grain Gameking as being reliable for use at close ranges on potentially dangerous animals weighing over 450kg (1000lb). The 300 grain Gameking excels in open country, dumping vast amounts of energy which affords some increase in game body weights. From a muzzle velocity of 2600fps, the 300 grain Gameking breaks 2200fps at around 200 yards after which, we see a large decrease in bullet stress (though heavy weight shedding may still be apparent). Provided the 300 grain Gameking meets good resistance, it can be used with great success out to an effective range of around 470 yards or 1800fps.

There are certainly many contradictory variables to be considered when assessing the .375 caliber Gameking bullets. For instance, the sheer mass of the 300 grain pill causes a great deal of destruction in comparison to lesser bores loaded with premium projectiles. Additionally, the .375” 300 grain Nosler Partition with its locked rear core is not a great deal tougher than the .375” Gameking. Further still, many premium .375” bullets do not produce the same level of internal wounding, especially when used across a wide velocity spectrum (out to longer ranges). Nevertheless, the Gameking does have limitations and as suggested, the variables are many. To this end, my preference is to consider 450kg (1000lb) as being a maximum weight limitation for potentially dangerous game where angled shots may have to be taken at close ranges. Dual loading can prove useful in this regard, a bonded bullet giving added insurance for close range work, follow up shots (or long range first shots) consisting of the Gameking as a means to maximize wounding potential. This is obviously the opposite to how many would use a .375, loading a soft point at the top of the rifle magazine backed with solids underneath. However, I have used this method in the past with success.

The 350gr SMK is not designed for hunting. The meplat can however be modified to enhance its performance but the SMK still requires large body weights of around 200kg (440lb) to help initiate expansion after modifications. For true long range hunting, the Rocky Mountain bullets are more effective, however these also need a good deal of body weight resistance to help initiate expansion. The Rocky Mountain .375” bullets are a big game bullet and are not designed for hunting smaller bodied deer. The momentum of a heavy .375” bullet is the major issue here, even though the jacket and core of the Rocky Mountain bullets are designed to produce fast and full expansion. The .375 bore is, in plain terms, not ideal for hunting lean game at very long ranges and is far better suited to large bodied game which provide optimum resistance. Further to this point, readers are urged to be very wary of any long range bullet designed for maximum weight retention such as the Barnes LRX which can prove to be an immensely slow killing regardless of game weights. These topics (including SMK meplat alterations) are discussed in more detail within my Long Range Cartridges book.

Current projectiles from Hornady include the 250 grain GMX, the 270 grain Interlock RP, the 300 grain DGX and the 300 grain DGS. Sadly, Hornady are no longer producing the 225 grain Interlock (one of my all-time favorites) or the 270 grain round nose. Also gone is the .375 Winchester 220 grain flat point. My my, what a terrible state of affairs. For many years, a good number of hunters came to rely on the conventional 225 and 270 grain Hornady bullet designs. But as time has marched on and as hunters have tried using these non-premium bullets on heavy game, the squeaky wheeled complaints have outweighed the happy users. Now, Hornady offer just the one conventional bullet. Unfortunately, this has neither the light weight of the 225gr pill, nor the blunt nose of the old round nose design and therefore does not offer the same spectacular performance on lighter bodied deer. The 225 grain bullet was a particularly emphatic killer. Still, at close to moderate ranges, the 270 grain Hornady can be highly traumatic when used on lighter weight medium game. But generally speaking, this bullet is best suited to larger bodied deer (red to Elk) on which it performs exceptionally well.

Having covered the GMX, DGX and DGS in the factory ammunition section, there is little more to be said here. Of the three bullets, the homogenous copper 250 grain GMX can be very useful at impact velocities over 2600fps, achieving desirable penetration, wounding, but also nervous trauma on game weighing up to 600kg (1300lb). The new (as at Oct 2017) 300 grain bonded DGX bullet will also hopefully prove equally useful for hunting game weighing up to and above over 700kg (1540lb). On game of this size, a 250 grain bullet is simply too light and cannot be expected to produce nervous shock. Instead, the hunter will generally achieve best results by either aiming to strike the CNS with a heavy bullet, or use the same to smash bone and destroy vitals placing equal emphasis on both wounding and penetration. We can only hope that the 300 grain Bonded DGX works well in this role.

Speer bullets include the 235 grain semi spitzer Hotcor, the 270 grain BTSP and the 285 grain Grand Slam. Of these, the 235 grain Hotcor has over the years become very popular as a light game bullet but also popular among those wanting reduced recoil hand loads. The 235 grain bullet works quite well, though when used on light game it could do without any core bonding which unfortunately inhibits energy transfer. When loaded to 2900fps and used on lean game, the 235 grain Hotcor does its best work out to ranges of around 240 yards or 2200fps. Beyond this range, kills can be somewhat delayed. At 1800fps, expansion on lean game can be very poor (note that this bullet can be a slow killer in hand gun cartridges. In contrast to this, The 235 grain Speer can be a very emphatic killer on larger bodied deer while showing more uniform results at lower impact velocities, though it should not be used below 1800fps. The faster this bullet can be driven, the better it performs on the medium game body weights it was intended for.

The 270 grain Speer BTSP is a wonderful open country / long range bullet which can work well as a dual load in rifles that will print dual loads closely together. It is a shame that Speer do not furnish this as a 225 grain option for White Tail deer but no doubt, the squeaky wheels would once again turn and complain that it ‘just blows up’ on heavy game. In any case, the 270 grain bullet is softer than the Gameking, readily dumping energy although it requires game weights of at least 150kg (330lb) or heavier to help initiate expansion below 2200fps. This bullet is at its best when used at extended ranges on large bodied deer, antelope or bear, a simply excellent bullet design when used with understanding. Both the Gameking and Speer BTSP can be used to impact velocities of 1800fps. But of the two designs, the Speer is more malleable at low impact velocities. Having said this, it is unwise to push this bullet design below 1800fps. At impact velocities of 1800 to 1600fps, performance can be severely limited depending on shot placement and body weight resistance.

The Speer Grand Slam is a premium bullet but, unfortunately, I have had several bad experiences with this bullet design (bullet blow up) and am too distrustful to use it on heavy game. I understand that many other hunters have put this bullet to good use and I do not doubt their results. I will say no more.

As already mentioned in the factory ammunition section, Nosler produce both the Accubond and Partition in 260 and 300 grain weights. Along with these, Nosler also produce their banded solid bullets weighing 260 and 300 grains, either of which can be run in conjunction with the Partition bullets, provided one’s rifle can shoot both to a similar POI.

Although many hunters have had wonderful results with the Partition bullets over the years, there are limitations to this bullet design. As suggested elsewhere, if the Partition strikes heavy ball joints, it can shed its rear core. This often appears as though it were as a result of tumbling but on closer inspection, this description is not fully satisfactory. After impacting immensely heavy bone, the rear of the bullet can swell (both jacket and core). After losing its integrity, the now loose fitting core attempts to continue forwards. The slightest level of yaw causes the core to seek the path of least resistance, thereby turning the projectile over. The Nosler Partition could be made somewhat more effective were it to feature a bonded rear core (no change to front core) or via a steel insert as per the Partition Gold bullet design. This would be very useful in the medium and large bores. But instead, we have the weaker Accubond design which can perform terribly on heavy game, especially when used in the Weatherby and RUM.

Regardless of these limitations, the 260 grain Partition has great strengths, rendering very broad wounds over a wide range of impact velocities on game weighing up to 450kg or 1000lb. This is an excellent performer down to impact velocities of 2200fps. Between 2200fps and 2000fps, killing tends to be slightly delayed but clean. The 260 grain Partition reaches its limit at 1800fps. In a very general manner of speaking, this is extremely useful for ordinary hunting out to ranges of around 300 yards. Core bonded bullets simply cannot render the same level of wounding across such a wide velocity spectrum.

The 300 grain Partition deserves more careful consideration. In a factory load yielding around 2400fps, it is not placed under any great stress. But in a fast hand load (or when used in the .375 Ruger or .375 Weatherby), 600kg or 1300lb should be considered the maximum limit. Furthermore, the higher the velocity (.378 Weatherby / RUM), the more we need to be mindful of excessive body weights. When used in the .378 Weatherby or RUM, it can simply be safer to limit body weights to 450kg (1000lb). Shot placement must also be taken into consideration. The 300 grain Partition works well on game weighing up to 600kg with center shoulder shots, neck / chest junction shots or meat saver shots. But if used to smash round bone (especially quartering on), penetration may be limited. The more one understands this bullet, the better it can be put to use.

Barnes Original bullets in .375 caliber include the 255 grain flat point (for the .375 Winchester), the 255 grain 38-55 flat point (features a wider and shorter meplat than the Win bullet) and a .377” 255 grain flat point, also for the .38-55 which should never be used in .375” caliber rifles. The Barnes TSX is available in the weights 235, 270, 300 and 350 grains. Barnes also produce a 250 grain Tipped TSX (TTSX) and for many years have produced monolithic solids.

For those wanting a light game bullet for woods hunting, the Barnes flat point can be used with spectacular results out to ranges of around 250 yards. The typical impact velocities are never so high as to compromise performance, especially at these bullet weights. It is certainly interesting to experiment with such bullet designs.

The 235 TSX can be used on large bodied deer and plains game with excellent effect. But at long ranges, this bullet (and the TTSX) does not have the same energy dumping abilities of the Gameking. Too often I hear the comment that Barnes copper bullets are the best because they cause less meat damage, forgetting that bullets kill by causing tissue damage. If those who made such comments truly understood what they were saying, they would see how ludicrous this statement really is. Fortunately, the frontal area of the .375 ensures that these bullets are somewhat more emphatic than some of the small bore Barnes offerings. Put simple, the 235 grain TSX is at its most spectacular when used at close to moderate ranges on large bodied game weighing up to 450kg (990lb).

The heavier Barnes bullets come into their own when hunting heavy game. The Barnes bullets may occasionally shed petals on heavy bone, but they stabilize, get through and get the job done. As for bullet weight selection, the reader is advised to consider the virtues of impact velocities greater than 2600fps, especially when using homogenous copper projectiles. The further one can get above 2600fps the better, and it is here that a 250 grain Homogenous copper bullet can come into its own. The heavier Barnes bullets simply cannot produce the same level of physical and nervous trauma – only deeper penetration. Those who wish to target bovine sized animals should consider the 250 grain Barnes (or similar designs from lesser known makers) to be a go-to bullet design, loaded fast and used at very close ranges. As suggested, the 270 grain, 300 and 350 grain bullets really only offer increased penetration (at the expense of wounding). There is simply no great need to use these heavier weight bullets on game weighing less than 700kg (1500lb).

Swift currently offer four bullets in .375 caliber which include the 250, 270 and 300 grain A-Frame’s along with their new for 2017 Break-Away Solid (I have yet to test this) which is somewhat similar to the current Woodleigh solid bullet design.

The Swift bullets are each capable of delivering high trauma on large bodied game. Under heavy resistance, the A-Frame bullets tend to ‘ball up’ as the rear core expands but refuses to yield. The result of this change in form is increased energy transfer, resulting in very fast kills. Having said this, the loss in SD can inhibit the depth of trauma, therefore if hunting heavy game (bovines), the 300 grain bullet weight proves to be the best, especially when driven fast and used at close ranges. As a side note to this, I have found that while higher velocities tend to place such bullets under great stress, the 300 grain bonded bullets tend to produce very wide internal wounds and in doing so, the speed of killing can offset any reduction in penetration.

Woodleigh produce a good range of .375” bullets starting at 235 grains through to 270, 300 and 350 grains. Those with a blunt round nose are softer than their protected points (including the Heavy Duty) counterparts. The 235 grain bullet is designed for Sambar, an animal that was introduced into Australia with a body weight similar to Elk. This is a bullet that Victorian hunters can use to tackle these large deer from various angles out to ordinary hunting ranges. A very well designed bullet for these very tough but not extremely heavy animals. As for the heavy bullet designs, as suggested, the round nose bullets are of a softer design and in some situations can prove to be the most versatile where game weights vary by several hundred pounds. But for dedicated heavy game hunting, the 300 grain Protected Point strikes the balance of wide wounding versus penetration. Again, hunters are advised to get close with this bullet to maximize trauma. If possible, use the front line of the front leg (autonomic plexus ganglia) as an aiming point or if the animal is slightly quartering on, take the point of the shoulder for maximum energy transfer. Expect delayed killing and expect to take follow up shots on heavy game due to low impact velocities. The 300 gain Hydrostatically Stabilized Solid as mentioned in the factory ammunition section, is designed to produce a degree of hydraulic force coupled with maximum penetration. As a stand-alone hunting bullet, its ability to generate a wide wound is somewhat limited. To achieve fast killing with body shots, the hunter must aim well forwards. But I dare say some hunters will ignore this advice, aim behind the shoulder, strike the heart and wonder why their animals run such great distances. These educational issues aside, the Woodleigh is well designed for CNS shooting.

The 350 grain Woodleigh bullets (round nose and protected point) are designed to expand between impact velocities of 1900 and 2500fps with expected muzzle velocities of 2400 to 2450fps. I will be the first to admit that I have a terrible habit of using Woodleigh soft nose bullets in ways that they were never designed and am happy to run these in a larger magnum just to get above 2600fps at the target. I have never been a huge fan of using core bonded bullets below 2400fps on game of any size. Having said this, on very heavy game, these bullets can be put to good use. The key here is shot placement. Those who aim behind the shoulder will invariably empty their magazines while those who aim forwards will be able to put these to good use within three shots.

Closing comments

The .375 H&H Magnum is a true all-round workhorse, neither overpowered or underpowered, working very well on a very broad range of game. Provided hunters continue to have access to a broad range of bullet styles and not just the tough numbers, this cartridge and its kin will continue to prove useful well into the future.

Suggested loads: .375 H&H

Barrel length: 25”

No

ID

 

Sectional Density

Ballistic Coefficient

Observed MV Fps

ME
Ft-lb’s

1

FL

Hornady 250gr GMX*

.254

.430

2800

4351

2

FL

Fed / Rem 270gr RN

.274

.323

2620

4115

3

HL

235gr Speer HC (also TSX)

.239

.301

2900

3514

4

HL

250gr Sierra BTSP

.254

.375

2800

4351

5

HL

250gr Barnes TTSX*

.254

.424

2800

4351

6

HL

300gr Woodleigh PP*

.305

.380

2600

4502

 

Suggested sight settings and bullet paths

 

 

 

1

Yards

100

208

240

 

 

 

 

Bt. path

+2

0

-2

 

 

 

2

Yards

100

220

255

300

 

 

 

Bt. path

+3

0

-3

-8.4

 

 

3

Yards

100

247

284

300

325

350

 

Bt. path

+3

0

-3

-4.7

-7.7

-11.3

4

Yards

100

243

280

300

325

350

 

Bt. path

+3

0

-3

-5

-8

-11.5

5

Yards

100

208

240

 

 

 

 

Bt. path

+2

0

-2

 

 

 

6

Yards

100

190

220

250

 

 

 

Bt. path

+2

0

-2

-4.6

 

 


Sight height 1.6” (Scope).

* Loads 1, 5 and 6 considered as close range loads in order to ensure high impact velocities on heavy game.
 

No

At yards

10mphXwind

Velocity

Ft-lb’s

1

100

.8

2589

3721

2

300

11.3

1865

2084

3

300

10.5

2043

2177

4

300

8.9

2100

2447

5

100

.8

2586

3712

6

100

1

2372

3748

 

Please pay very close attention to retained velocities as per comments within text.

375 H&H Final

.375 H&H

Imperial

Metric

A

.532

13.5

B

.513

13.03

C

15 deg

 

D

.450

11.43

E

.402

10.21

F

2.412

61.27

G

.438

11.13

H

2.850

72.4

Max Case

2.850

72.4

Trim length

2.840

72.1

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